Welcome to NW Fruit!

Click here to see our Best Varieties handout.

Registration link for April 3rd webinar.

This is what our kiwis looked like just before Kiwibob came to our rescue!. Now we know how to keep them under control. This is our old support structure; you can learn about the new structure at our webinar this Saturday, April 3rd.

The webinar this Saturday, which begins at 10 am, will start with a presentation by Richard Fairfield on our support structures for kiwi plants and blueberry netting, followed by a Q & A session.

Then we will have a video with Kiwibob teaching how to winter prune kiwis along with information about kiwi culture. Kiwis need to be pruned twice a year, in January and July. We already have a video with Kiwibob on how to do the summer pruning of kiwis at the bottom of this web page. The video on winter pruning of kiwis has never yet been shown, so this is the first viewing. Q & A session after.

Please click on the link below if you wish to register for the webinar, which is free to all.

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Rx7llYZySPOoQlOlzrq8xQ

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Next Webinar April 3, 2021

Our next Webinar will be Saturday April 3rd at 10 am.

We will be covering the structures we use at the Fruit Garden in Mount Vernon for the kiwis and for the blueberry netting. We will also see an excellent video on winter pruning of Kiwis.

Our new Blueberry netting structure is strong and easy to net.

Dr. Bob Norton

We have received news that Dr. Bob Norton, who was the the supervisor for Washington Sate University’s Research Station at Mount Vernon for 30 years starting in the early 60’s, passed away yesterday. Dr. Norton was a frequent speaker at out Winter Field Day. We will have an article about Dr. Norton in our June newsletter.

Dr. Norton in 2011 at the Winter Field Day.

A Great Loss

Our Fruit Garden Designer, past president and long term board member, Kristan Johnson, passed away this month on November 17th.

Kristan was hired by WWFRF in 1997 to design the Fruit Garden and he ended up designing the basic layout of the entire WSU Volunteer Display Garden area. That same year he began to serve on the board of directors of WWFRF, and later served as president for 6 years. As the Fruit Garden designer and chair of the Fruit Garden committee, he guided the development of the Fruit Garden through the years and even personally moved many of the plants that were transplanted from the WSU plots so that they would remain available for public viewing after the WSU tests were competed.

Kristan had boundless enthusiasm, energy, and a multitude of ideas which he channeled into projects such as the Fruit Garden self-guided tour signs and the unique espalier Welcome sign. He will be greatly missed by all of us.

Tom Wake (Garden Manager), Christy Nieto, and Kristan Johnson in 2015
The espalier Welcome sign as seen from the Master Gardeners Discovery Garden

Posted on November 30, 2020 by admin

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Honeycrisp apples on the Welcome espalier.

Our Fruit Garden has a collection of over 30 heritage apple varieties in the Antique Apple Collection, mostly around the center oval of the garden. During our Winter Field Day in March we offer scionwood of many of these varieties for grafting so you can either graft your own or have one of our expert grafters put a little tree together for you for a nominal fee. Now is a good time for you to learn about (and taste) these heritage varieties to see which ones you might like to see growing in your own orchard, whether large or small.

Golden Russett apples have incredible flavor; you won’t find these at the grocery store!

We have hardy kiwis, which look like a large grape and don’t need to be peeled, and the more well known fuzzy kiwis in our Fruit Garden. Kiwi vines need a strong trellis, and we have installed a new trellis this year, which was designed by Richard Fairfield who will be talking about the kiwis and how to trellis them. You will be able to take some kiwi fruit home from the event.

Our new kiwi trellis is much sturdier than the old one.

While many people know what figs are, it may surprise you to know that you can grow wonderful figs here in Western Washington.

A luscious fig awaits discovery…

Medlars are an ancient fruit that few people know about. They grow on a bush or small tree and are attractive in the garden. How does one eat this mysterious fruit? This will be your opportunity to find out.

What is this strange fruit? A Medlar.

Our Fruit Garden

Our Fruit Garden, located at 16650 State Route 536, Mount Vernon, WA, is open to the public 7 days a week from dawn to dusk. The Fruit Garden is west of the Discovery Garden.

If you are not able to visit our Fruit Garden in person, you can take a home Fruit Garden Tour.

See our blog posts for news about events and other announcements.

Become a member!

Join the Fruit Garden volunteers!

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